Haas producing a Formula One blueprint for others to follow

Haas, Grosjean: “Prima giornata di test positiva, auto bilanciata”

It is safe to say that Haas have raised many an eyebrow with their performances so far in what has been a blistering start to life in Formula One.

The introduction of Gene Haas’ operation to the grid has been helped in no small part by the acquisition of Romain Grosjean, whose calm and unflappable presence has spearheaded the American outfit’s challenge on the track.

If a controlled drive to sixth place in the season opener in Australia was eye-catching enough, then the Frenchman’s charge to fifth in Bahrain was outstanding. It means that, just three races into its existence, Haas has amassed 18 points, 16 more than the Manor team in its various guises has scored in more than six years.

The team may have endured a tough weekend in China, but the evidence of this season’s opening salvo suggests that Shanghai was just as likely to be a blip rather than a sign of them falling back down to earth with a bump.

As a result of a technical partnership with Ferrari, Haas is using power units and gearboxes courtesy of the Scuderia, and thanks to a loophole in the sporting regulations, were given unlimited use of the windtunnel at Maranello in 2015, before they officially became an F1 constructor.

With the added benefits of two years’ preparation time, healthy finances and racing pedigree from Haas’ NASCAR operation in America, it means that they have arrived in Formula One well prepared.

While some may be critical of Haas’ approach to the sport, their arrival on the grid this year has been a breath of fresh air.

After the debacle of 2010 in which three teams were given spots in Formula One and allowed to turn up wholly unprepared to compete at the top level of motorsport, it is reassuring to see that a team can set up its own operation from scratch and hit the ground running.

That it has done so with a helping hand from Ferrari should not be allowed to cloud the good work they have done. With a car built by Dallara, but designed by Haas engineers, and bases in North Carolina and Banbury which they will use to take more and more of their operation in-house as time goes on, they have come into Formula One with a unique blueprint and shown that it can be successful.

This is not a customer car built by Ferrari, it is merely an independent effort support by the Scuderias, and to be honest, if teams could enter Formula One with a chassis built by another team, with the proviso that within a set period of time they are producing their own challengers, would that really be a bad thing?

With a reputed budget of just $100m – by no means excessive in Formula One terms – the success of Haas has proved that it is still possible for a start-up operation to enter the sport and be competitive. If their fast start to life continues and Grosjean and Esteban Gutierrez continue to deliver the goods, it increases the chances of others taking notice and being tempted to join the grid themselves.

Formula One has an entry limit of 26 cars, but the number of competitors has not been that high since 1995. If more people like Haas see the possible benefits of entering the series, who would be betting against a full grid a few years down the road?

Stephen D’Albiac

 

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